Joe Montana Football

1018467-joe_montana_football_boxart

Continuing the tradition of playing football games at the start of the 2016 season, next up is Joe Montana Football (Giant Bomb|Wikipedia). Joe Montana was released at the beginning of the Genesis’ lifespan and was a symbol of Sega’s intent to capture the sports market in the US. Sega of America signed a contract with Joe Montana to use his name and likeness in a series of games, much to the chagrin of Sega of Japan – the Japanese office was concerned that the titles would not make enough money to cover the cost of Montana’s contract. The game also had some troubled development – being delayed and moved to another developer before release. Despite this, a completely acceptable title came out the other side and Sega published several sequels until the contract’s expiration in 1995.

Because this is not an officially licensed NFL game, team names are just generic cities (Philadelphia, San Fransisco, Houston, etc.). There are very few modes (3 according to Giant Bomb’s wiki article) and the whole game feels very bare bones. I played the standard timed mode against the computer. There are a few options when you start, such as what opponent, duration, but nothing out of the basics. Joe Montana will give you advice before the game starts on the opponent’s weaknesses, but other than that and the title screen he doesn’t really make an appearance. Gameplay is pretty standard for a football game of this era – you control some players on the field, you pick plays – there is no team management aspects or play creation or anything that advanced. Controls are fairly intuitive and everything plays fairly well even if it’s no frills.

1665176-joe_montana_football__90___u______004

Graphically, this is not going to win any awards. The title screen looks good but all the menus are spartan and the in game graphics look like they could have been done on an 8-bit system (there was a port of this to the master system). Really, the graphics are not impressive and I can’t imagine them being loved even in their heyday.

Sound effects were fine – nothing spectacular but certainly better overall than the graphics. Music was, well, limited. I only recall hearing one music track, and while it was good, hearing it over and over again would get tiresome quickly. Surprisingly, Joe Montana did do some voice sampling work at the title screen that sounds excellent – probably the best voice sampling I’ve heard on the Genesis – so there’s that.

Verdict: Back on the shelf. This one hasn’t aged particularly well and is too basic for it’s own good.

Images courtesy of Giant Bomb

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s